John Wayne and Reader Response

In today’s blog, I want to talk about John Wayne. But first, this:

Is it possible for a reader to understand your writing better than you do? Apparently so. Read Margie Netherton’s Facebook response to my last blog (Feeling Thankful). She nailed it—better than I could.

It’s what I enjoy most about reader feedback. Every person sees a book with a different set of eyes shaped by one’s own experiences. Thus, all have a different take.

Sharing these thoughts in a review helps an author know how his or her words appear to others. At the same time, reviews help potential readers know if this is a book for them. Does it address needs they are feeling?

Which is why I hope those of you who read The Best Is Yet To Be (and found it helpful) will consider writing a review on Amazon. Just go to amazon.com, search for Mike Bellah and click on the paperback version of the book. Then scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click on the box “write a customer review.”

First, they will ask for a title—a few words that describe what you will say. Then, in the review section, give your take on the book. Be honest and use your own words. One sentence is fine. Just tell other readers what the book did for you and/or what it can do for them.

Now, for a more interesting topic: Last night Charlotte and I ate at True Grit in Ridgeway, Colorado. It’s located in one of the buildings where John Wayne filmed the classic western. The rooms are filled with pictures of the Duke.

Makes me long for a simpler time—when I could watch a full-length movie and enjoy a large Dr. Pepper for under $1—and where Marshall Rooster Cogburn could put everything right with the world with one shootout in a mountain meadow.

“Fill your hands you !?#$!?!”

3 thoughts on “John Wayne and Reader Response

  1. I long for the day in which I also could enjoy a full length movie and a large Dr Pepper, for a different reason.
    Now I usually miss at least three segments because of needed restroom breaks.

    1. You are funny, Eugene. Actually, I think I exaggerated the price. True Grit came out in 1969 when movies were already well over $1.

      1. Mike, your memory could be better than you think. In 1969 it was still common in Amarillo and Lubbock to go to the “Dollar Movie.”
        Usually featuring movies that had been out for a while.
        I doubt that you could have included the DP.
        I can remember getting into the old Varsity Theater in Canyon for fifteen cents. I think a small drink was a dime.

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